Posts Tagged ‘Northern Territory Barramundi’

DIY Barramundi Fishing

The Northern Territory is one of the most remote, unpopulated parts of Australia. Many visitors are pleasantly surprised by the standard of the roads and the modern amenities available near some of the best fishing areas. Other parts of northern Australia, such as Cape York Peninsula and the Kimberley, have some great fishing areas, but are not so easy to access.

Nonetheless, from a barramundi fisherman’s point of view, northern conditions are different from those down south, and fishermen equipped with the right vehicle, boat and fishing tackle will enjoy the Top End fishing experience to the full.

That’s not to say you can’t have a great time with a 2WD vehicle, a car-topper dinghy and a two-bob fishing rod. But sooner or later you will want to upgrade to really enjoy barramundi fishing. Here we look at what is best suited to local conditions.

Did you know?

You are not allowed to take mud crabs using a trap in Kakadu National Park. Click the link to see Northern Territory fishing regulations … barramundi fishing regulations.

big barramundi

Keep in mind that barramundi fishing is also very tightly controlled in Western Australia and Queensland.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 1, 2010 at 8:21 am

Categories: Barramundi Fishing Tactics & Spots   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Barramundi Fishing Seasons

wet season barramundi fishingAustralia’s Northern Territory has three basic seasons – the wet season monsoon (usually late December to April), the dry season (May to September) and the stormy "build-up" – the time of increasing heat and humidity leading up to the wet season (late September to December).

There is usually very little "build-down" from the wet season as the cool dry season south-easterly wind arrives almost overnight once the monsoon weakens.

What does all this mean for barramundi fishing?

Barramundi love heat. They bite really well in the build-up when it is warm, and they are preparing to spawn. But this can also be an uncomfortable time to fish unless you limit trips to the cooler mornings and afternoons, and at night.

During the early wet season the weather is often cooler but barramundi can be hard to catch as the rivers flood and the fish spread out in the floodwaters.

Towards the end of the wet season the fish tend to gather in certain areas, usually the mouths of floodplain creeks.

This is the run-off season and it is a great time to fish. A wet season that drops rain consistently from December produces better fishing than a wet season that dumps it all in one lot late in February or March.

Just after the wet season is the "greenwater" period where the rivers are full of greenish (clear by Territory standards) rainwater. This is a great time to fish because water clarity is good. Territory rivers are otherwise muddy and turbid.

Once the dry season south-easterly hits, the water in rivers and billabongs begins to cool and barramundi slow down, however they can be caught right through the year, especially during warm spells. Barramundi fishing is therefore something you can enjoy all year.

run-off barramundi fishing

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 30, 2010 at 5:04 am

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Where To Go Barramundi Fishing

The Northern Territory is by far and away the best place to catch barramundi. That is because the Top End has the right habitat, and lots of it. There has been little impact from agriculture and the like.

Barramundi live in fresh and salt water and can be caught in rivers, lagoons and along the coast. The fish tend to congregate in certain areas with the changing seasons.

Fishermen who target big barramundi tend to fish the lower sections of big tidal rivers such as the Daly, Mary, Adelaide, and East and South Alligator Rivers, and some coastal creeks. Most big fish are caught just after the wet season.

The Northern Territory has excellent roads to boat ramps on most of its wild rivers, but finding barramundi hotspots on these vast waterways can be daunting.

That’s why many people hire professional barramundi guides.

The Northern Territory has a stocked dam which provides good fishing at times. Manton Dam is about an hour’s drive south of Darwin, and is a picturesque and safe place to take a family barramundi fishing.

Billabongs are popular venues for mostly smaller barramundi, which are caught in a setting among lillies and loads of wildlife. Billabongs also hold freshwater sportfish such as saratoga and tarpon. Never be tempted to have a swim though as big crocodiles are abundant in the NT.

Daly River barramundi

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 5:02 am

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