Posts Tagged ‘Lures for Barramundi’

DIY Barramundi Fishing

The Northern Territory is one of the most remote, unpopulated parts of Australia. Many visitors are pleasantly surprised by the standard of the roads and the modern amenities available near some of the best fishing areas. Other parts of northern Australia, such as Cape York Peninsula and the Kimberley, have some great fishing areas, but are not so easy to access.

Nonetheless, from a barramundi fisherman’s point of view, northern conditions are different from those down south, and fishermen equipped with the right vehicle, boat and fishing tackle will enjoy the Top End fishing experience to the full.

That’s not to say you can’t have a great time with a 2WD vehicle, a car-topper dinghy and a two-bob fishing rod. But sooner or later you will want to upgrade to really enjoy barramundi fishing. Here we look at what is best suited to local conditions.

Did you know?

You are not allowed to take mud crabs using a trap in Kakadu National Park. Click the link to see Northern Territory fishing regulations … barramundi fishing regulations.

big barramundi

Keep in mind that barramundi fishing is also very tightly controlled in Western Australia and Queensland.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 1, 2010 at 8:21 am

Categories: Barramundi Fishing Tactics & Spots   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Barramundi Fishing Reels

Daiwa Heartland XA Baitcaster ... an ideal saltwater barramundi reel

A small overhead casting reel called a baitcaster (above) is the most popular design for barramundi fishing. Though small, these reels are powerful, and allow easy thumb control of the spool when casting.

Baitcasters are ideal for trolling and good for casting with medium to heavyweight lures and baits.

Threadline or spinning reels are becoming more popular, especially with those who throw very small, light lures for barramundi, because it is difficult to cast a light lure with an overhead reel, especially into the wind.

Don’t bother with a cheap reel however, it will be more trouble than it is worth. Tropical conditions cause corrosion, and big fish will soon ruin cheap reels.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 6:43 am

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Barramundi Fishing Lures

Bibbed minnows are the most popular barramundi lures. Soft plastic lures are also popular, especially during the wet season.

Surface lures take third place, and are good at night time. Jigs can work well alongside snags.

Most bibbed minnows float until retrieved. Sinking and suspending models are also available.

Floating lures can be cast over rocks and other snags. They rise when the retrieve is halted.

A floating-diving minnow with a big bib is best for trolling snags. Deep-divers tend to swim head-down with the bib bumping over snags, keeping hooks clear.

Sinking minnows are harder to fish as the lure will sink into snags. Nonetheless they are effective when snags are too deep or steep for floating-diving barramundi lures.

Depth of dive is the main issue when choosing a bibbed minnow.

The lure’s depth of dive should match the depth you fish. Most lures are made in several dive ratings, usually stated in feet as 3+, 5+, 10+.

Dive depth also varies according to the boat speed, the amount of line out and line thickness.

Trolling depth can be altered a little by raising or lowering the rod, but fishermen still need shallow, medium and deep divers for trolling at different depths.

Shallow divers or surface lures are essential for fishing flats and shallow bank edges where predators ambush bait.

Soft plastics and prawns have become popular in the barramundi fishery because they are effective, especially in the wet season, often getting a strike when hard bodied lures won’t.

The waggly tail seems to drive predatory fish wild.

Soft plastics no longer have to be assembled on a jig head – they can be bought in packs with each lure’s hook and weight moulded into the body.

Some anglers however like to use a range of jig heads on the same bodies and buy the heads and bodies separately.

Resin heads are popular for finesse fishing with almost unweighted lures, and can be hugely effective because of their lifelike action.

Most soft plastics have a single hook and the hook-up rate can be low, but the fish will often strike soft lures multiple times. Plastic prawn imitations also work well in northern fresh and saltwater.

Rattling jigs are effective when jigged along deep snags. Jigs can also be cast and retrieved but tend to foul snags because they have no bib.

Poppers and fizzers are worked on the surface and can be very effective at night or in shallow water.

They can also be effective around snags and weedbeds.

Work poppers slowly, especially at night.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 6:34 am

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